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Supabase CLI

The Supabase CLI provides tools to develop your project locally and deploy to the Supabase Platform. The CLI is still under development, but it contains all the functionality for working with your Supabase projects and the Supabase Platform.

Global flags

Supabase CLI supports global flags for every command.

Flags

    --create-ticket
    Optional
    no type

    create a support ticket for any CLI error

    --debug
    Optional
    no type

    output debug logs to stderr

    --dns-resolver <[ native | https ]>
    Optional
    no type

    lookup domain names using the specified resolver

    --experimental
    Optional
    no type

    enable experimental features

    -h, --help
    Optional
    no type

    help for supabase

    --workdir <string>
    Optional
    no type

    path to a Supabase project directory

$ supabase init

Initialize configurations for Supabase local development.

A supabase/config.toml file is created in your current working directory. This configuration is specific to each local project.

You may override the directory path by specifying the SUPABASE_WORKDIR environment variable or --workdir flag.

In addition to config.toml, the supabase directory may also contain other Supabase objects, such as migrations, functions, tests, etc.

Flags

  • --use-orioledb
    Optional
    no type

    Use OrioleDB storage engine for Postgres

  • --with-vscode-settings
    Optional
    no type

    Generate VS Code settings for Deno.

supabase init

$ supabase login

Connect the Supabase CLI to your Supabase account by logging in with your personal access token.

Your access token is stored securely in native credentials storage. If native credentials storage is unavailable, it will be written to a plain text file at ~/.supabase/access-token.

If this behavior is not desired, such as in a CI environment, you may skip login by specifying the SUPABASE_ACCESS_TOKEN environment variable in other commands.

The Supabase CLI uses the stored token to access Management APIs for projects, functions, secrets, etc.

Flags

  • --name <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Name that will be used to store token in your settings, defaults to built-in token name generator

  • --no-browser
    Optional
    no type

    Do not open browser automatically

  • --token <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Use provided token instead of automatic login flow

supabase login

$ supabase start

Starts the Supabase local development stack.

Requires supabase/config.toml to be created in your current working directory by running supabase init.

All service containers are started by default. You can exclude those not needed by passing in -x flag. To exclude multiple containers, either pass in a comma separated string, such as -x gotrue,imgproxy, or specify -x flag multiple times.

It is recommended to have at least 7GB of RAM to start all services.

Health checks are automatically added to verify the started containers. Use --ignore-health-check flag to ignore these errors.

Flags

  • -x, --exclude <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Names of containers to not start. [gotrue,realtime,storage-api,imgproxy,kong,inbucket,postgrest,pgadmin-schema-diff,migra,postgres-meta,studio,edge-runtime,logflare,vector,pgbouncer,pg_prove]

  • --ignore-health-check
    Optional
    no type

    Ignore unhealthy services and exit 0

supabase start

$ supabase stop

Stops the Supabase local development stack.

Requires supabase/config.toml to be created in your current working directory by running supabase init.

All Docker resources are maintained across restarts. Use --no-backup flag to reset your local development data between restarts.

Flags

  • --no-backup
    Optional
    no type

    Deletes all data volumes after stopping.

  • --project-id <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Local project ID to stop.

supabase stop

$ supabase status

Shows status of the Supabase local development stack.

Requires the local development stack to be started by running supabase start or supabase db start.

You can export the connection parameters for initializing supabase-js locally by specifying the -o env flag. Supported parameters include JWT_SECRET, ANON_KEY, and SERVICE_ROLE_KEY.

Flags

  • -o, --output <[ env | pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format of status variables.

  • --override-name <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Override specific variable names.

supabase status

$ supabase test db

Executes pgTAP tests against the local database.

Requires the local development stack to be started by running supabase start.

Runs pg_prove in a container with unit test files volume mounted from supabase/tests directory. The test file can be suffixed by either .sql or .pg extension.

Since each test is wrapped in its own transaction, it will be individually rolled back regardless of success or failure.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Tests the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Runs pgTAP tests on the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Runs pgTAP tests on the local database.

supabase test db

$ supabase test new

Create a new test file

Flags

  • -t, --template <[ pgtap ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Template framework to generate.

supabase test new <name> [flags]

$ supabase gen keys

Generate keys for preview branch

Flags

  • -o, --output <[ env | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format of key variables.

  • --override-name <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Override specific variable names.

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase gen keys [flags]

$ supabase gen types typescript

Generate types for TypeScript. Must specify one of --local, --linked, --project-id, or --db-url

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Generate types from a database url.

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Generate types from the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Generate types from the local dev database.

  • --postgrest-v9-compat
    Optional
    no type

    Generate types compatible with PostgREST v9 and below. Only use together with --db-url.

  • --project-id <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Generate types from a project ID.

  • --schema <stringArray>
    Optional
    no type

    Schemas to generate types for.

supabase gen types typescript [flags]

$ supabase db pull

Pulls schema changes from a remote database. A new migration file will be created under supabase/migrations directory.

Requires your local project to be linked to a remote database by running supabase link. For self-hosted databases, you can pass in the connection parameters using --db-url flag.

Optionally, a new row can be inserted into the migration history table to reflect the current state of the remote database.

If no entries exist in the migration history table, pg_dump will be used to capture all contents of the remote schemas you have created. Otherwise, this command will only diff schema changes against the remote database, similar to running db diff --linked.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Pulls from the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Pulls from the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Pulls from the local database.

  • -p, --password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Password to your remote Postgres database.

  • -s, --schema <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Comma separated list of schema to include.

supabase db pull [migration name] [flags]

$ supabase db push

Pushes all local migrations to a remote database.

Requires your local project to be linked to a remote database by running supabase link. For self-hosted databases, you can pass in the connection parameters using --db-url flag.

The first time this command is run, a migration history table will be created under supabase_migrations.schema_migrations. After successfully applying a migration, a new row will be inserted into the migration history table with timestamp as its unique id. Subsequent pushes will skip migrations that have already been applied.

If you need to mutate the migration history table, such as deleting existing entries or inserting new entries without actually running the migration, use the migration repair command.

Use the --dry-run flag to view the list of changes before applying.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Pushes to the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --dry-run
    Optional
    no type

    Print the migrations that would be applied, but don't actually apply them.

  • --include-all
    Optional
    no type

    Include all migrations not found on remote history table.

  • --include-roles
    Optional
    no type

    Include custom roles from supabase/roles.sql.

  • --include-seed
    Optional
    no type

    Include seed data from supabase/seed.sql.

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Pushes to the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Pushes to the local database.

  • -p, --password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Password to your remote Postgres database.

supabase db push

$ supabase db reset

Resets the local database to a clean state.

Requires the local development stack to be started by running supabase start.

Recreates the local Postgres container and applies all local migrations found in supabase/migrations directory. If test data is defined in supabase/seed.sql, it will be seeded after the migrations are run. Any other data or schema changes made during local development will be discarded.

Note that since Postgres roles are cluster level entities, those changes will persist between resets. In order to reset custom roles, you need to restart the local development stack.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Resets the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Resets the linked project with local migrations.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Resets the local database with local migrations.

  • --version <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Reset up to the specified version.

supabase db reset

$ supabase db dump

Dumps contents from a remote database.

Requires your local project to be linked to a remote database by running supabase link. For self-hosted databases, you can pass in the connection parameters using --db-url flag.

Runs pg_dump in a container with additional flags to exclude Supabase managed schemas. The ignored schemas include auth, storage, and those created by extensions.

The default dump does not contain any data or custom roles. To dump those contents explicitly, specify either the --data-only and --role-only flag.

Flags

  • --data-only
    Optional
    no type

    Dumps only data records.

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Dumps from the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --dry-run
    Optional
    no type

    Prints the pg_dump script that would be executed.

  • -x, --exclude <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    List of schema.tables to exclude from data-only dump.

  • -f, --file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    File path to save the dumped contents.

  • --keep-comments
    Optional
    no type

    Keeps commented lines from pg_dump output.

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Dumps from the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Dumps from the local database.

  • -p, --password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Password to your remote Postgres database.

  • --role-only
    Optional
    no type

    Dumps only cluster roles.

  • -s, --schema <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Comma separated list of schema to include.

  • --use-copy
    Optional
    no type

    Uses copy statements in place of inserts.

supabase db dump -f supabase/schema.sql

$ supabase db diff

Diffs schema changes made to the local or remote database.

Requires the local development stack to be running when diffing against the local database. To diff against a remote or self-hosted database, specify the --linked or --db-url flag respectively.

Runs djrobstep/migra in a container to compare schema differences between the target database and a shadow database. The shadow database is created by applying migrations in local supabase/migrations directory in a separate container. Output is written to stdout by default. For convenience, you can also save the schema diff as a new migration file by passing in -f flag.

By default, all schemas in the target database are diffed. Use the --schema public,extensions flag to restrict diffing to a subset of schemas.

While the diff command is able to capture most schema changes, there are cases where it is known to fail. Currently, this could happen if you schema contains:

  • Changes to publication
  • Changes to storage buckets
  • Views with security_invoker attributes

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Diffs against the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • -f, --file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Saves schema diff to a new migration file.

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Diffs local migration files against the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Diffs local migration files against the local database.

  • -s, --schema <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Comma separated list of schema to include.

  • --use-migra
    Optional
    no type

    Use migra to generate schema diff.

  • --use-pg-schema
    Optional
    no type

    Use pg-schema-diff to generate schema diff.

  • --use-pgadmin
    Optional
    no type

    Use pgAdmin to generate schema diff.

supabase db diff -f my_table

$ supabase db lint

Lints local database for schema errors.

Requires the local development stack to be running when linting against the local database. To lint against a remote or self-hosted database, specify the --linked or --db-url flag respectively.

Runs plpgsql_check extension in the local Postgres container to check for errors in all schemas. The default lint level is warning and can be raised to error via the --level flag.

To lint against specific schemas only, pass in the --schema flag.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Lints the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --level <[ warning | error ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Error level to emit.

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Lints the linked project for schema errors.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Lints the local database for schema errors.

  • -s, --schema <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Comma separated list of schema to include.

supabase db lint

$ supabase db start

Starts local Postgres database

supabase db start

$ supabase migration new

Creates a new migration file locally.

A supabase/migrations directory will be created if it does not already exists in your current workdir. All schema migration files must be created in this directory following the pattern <timestamp>_<name>.sql.

Outputs from other commands like db diff may be piped to migration new <name> via stdin.

supabase migration new schema_test

$ supabase migration list

Lists migration history in both local and remote databases.

Requires your local project to be linked to a remote database by running supabase link. For self-hosted databases, you can pass in the connection parameters using --db-url flag.

Note that URL strings must be escaped according to RFC 3986.

Local migrations are stored in supabase/migrations directory while remote migrations are tracked in supabase_migrations.schema_migrations table. Only the timestamps are compared to identify any differences.

In case of discrepancies between the local and remote migration history, you can resolve them using the migration repair command.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Lists migrations of the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Lists migrations applied to the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Lists migrations applied to the local database.

  • -p, --password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Password to your remote Postgres database.

supabase migration list

$ supabase migration repair

Repairs the remote migration history table.

Requires your local project to be linked to a remote database by running supabase link.

If your local and remote migration history goes out of sync, you can repair the remote history by marking specific migrations as --status applied or --status reverted. Marking as reverted will delete an existing record from the migration history table while marking as applied will insert a new record.

For example, your migration history table may look like this after running db pull for the first time.

$ supabase migration list
        LOCAL      │     REMOTE     │     TIME (UTC)
  ─────────────────┼────────────────┼──────────────────────
    20230103054303 │ 20230103054303 │ 2023-01-03 05:43:03

To reset your migration history to a clean state, first delete your local migration file.

$ rm supabase/migrations/20230103054303_remote_commit.sql
$ supabase migration list
        LOCAL      │     REMOTE     │     TIME (UTC)
  ─────────────────┼────────────────┼──────────────────────
                   │ 20230103054303 │ 2023-01-03 05:43:03

Then mark the remote migration 20230103054303 as reverted.

$ supabase migration repair 20230103054303 --status reverted
Repaired migration history: 20230103054303 => reverted
$ supabase migration list
        LOCAL      │     REMOTE     │     TIME (UTC)
  ─────────────────┼────────────────┼──────────────────────

Now you can run db pull again to dump the remote schema as a local migration file.

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Repairs migrations of the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Repairs the migration history of the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Repairs the migration history of the local database.

  • -p, --password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Password to your remote Postgres database.

  • --status <[ applied | reverted ]>
    REQUIRED
    no type

    Version status to update.

supabase migration repair 20230103054303 --status reverted

$ supabase migration squash

Squash migrations to a single file

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Squashes migrations of the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Squashes the migration history of the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Squashes the migration history of the local database.

  • -p, --password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Password to your remote Postgres database.

  • --version <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Squash up to the specified version.

supabase migration squash [flags]

$ supabase migration up

Apply pending migrations to local database

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Applies migrations to the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --include-all
    Optional
    no type

    Include all migrations not found on remote history table.

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Applies pending migrations to the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Applies pending migrations to the local database.

supabase migration up [flags]

$ supabase inspect db

$ supabase inspect db calls

This command is much like the supabase inspect db outliers command, but ordered by the number of times a statement has been called.

You can use this information to see which queries are called most often, which can potentially be good candidates for optimisation.


                        QUERY                      │ TOTAL EXECUTION TIME │ PROPORTION OF TOTAL EXEC TIME │ NUMBER CALLS │  SYNC IO TIME
  ─────────────────────────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────┼───────────────────────────────┼──────────────┼──────────────────
    SELECT * FROM users WHERE id = $1              │ 14:50:11.828939      │ 89.8%                         │  183,389,757 │ 00:00:00.002018
    SELECT * FROM user_events                      │ 01:20:23.466633      │ 1.4%                          │       78,325 │ 00:00:00
    INSERT INTO users (email, name) VALUES ($1, $2)│ 00:40:11.616882      │ 0.8%                          │       54,003 │ 00:00:00.000322

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db calls

$ supabase inspect db long-running-queries

This command displays currently running queries, that have been running for longer than 5 minutes, descending by duration. Very long running queries can be a source of multiple issues, such as preventing DDL statements completing or vacuum being unable to update relfrozenxid.

  PID  │     DURATION    │                                         QUERY
───────┼─────────────────┼───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
 19578 | 02:29:11.200129 | EXPLAIN SELECT  "students".* FROM "students"  WHERE "students"."id" = 1450645 LIMIT 1
 19465 | 02:26:05.542653 | EXPLAIN SELECT  "students".* FROM "students"  WHERE "students"."id" = 1889881 LIMIT 1
 19632 | 02:24:46.962818 | EXPLAIN SELECT  "students".* FROM "students"  WHERE "students"."id" = 1581884 LIMIT 1

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db long-running-queries

$ supabase inspect db outliers

This command displays statements, obtained from pg_stat_statements, ordered by the amount of time to execute in aggregate. This includes the statement itself, the total execution time for that statement, the proportion of total execution time for all statements that statement has taken up, the number of times that statement has been called, and the amount of time that statement spent on synchronous I/O (reading/writing from the file system).

Typically, an efficient query will have an appropriate ratio of calls to total execution time, with as little time spent on I/O as possible. Queries that have a high total execution time but low call count should be investigated to improve their performance. Queries that have a high proportion of execution time being spent on synchronous I/O should also be investigated.


                 QUERY                   │ EXECUTION TIME   │ PROPORTION OF EXEC TIME │ NUMBER CALLS │ SYNC IO TIME
─────────────────────────────────────────┼──────────────────┼─────────────────────────┼──────────────┼───────────────
 SELECT * FROM archivable_usage_events.. │ 154:39:26.431466 │ 72.2%                   │ 34,211,877   │ 00:00:00
 COPY public.archivable_usage_events (.. │ 50:38:33.198418  │ 23.6%                   │ 13           │ 13:34:21.00108
 COPY public.usage_events (id, reporte.. │ 02:32:16.335233  │ 1.2%                    │ 13           │ 00:34:19.784318
 INSERT INTO usage_events (id, retaine.. │ 01:42:59.436532  │ 0.8%                    │ 12,328,187   │ 00:00:00
 SELECT * FROM usage_events WHERE (alp.. │ 01:18:10.754354  │ 0.6%                    │ 102,114,301  │ 00:00:00

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db outliers

$ supabase inspect db blocking

This command shows you statements that are currently holding locks and blocking, as well as the statement that is being blocked. This can be used in conjunction with inspect db locks to determine which statements need to be terminated in order to resolve lock contention.

    BLOCKED PID │ BLOCKING STATEMENT           │ BLOCKING DURATION │ BLOCKING PID │ BLOCKED STATEMENT                                                                      │ BLOCKED DURATION
  ──────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼───────────────────┼──────────────┼────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┼───────────────────
    253         │ select count(*) from mytable │ 00:00:03.838314   │        13495 │ UPDATE "mytable" SET "updated_at" = '2023─08─03 14:07:04.746688' WHERE "id" = 83719341 │ 00:00:03.821826

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db blocking

$ supabase inspect db locks

This command displays queries that have taken out an exclusive lock on a relation. Exclusive locks typically prevent other operations on that relation from taking place, and can be a cause of "hung" queries that are waiting for a lock to be granted.

If you see a query that is hanging for a very long time or causing blocking issues you may consider killing the query by connecting to the database and running SELECT pg_cancel_backend(PID); to cancel the query. If the query still does not stop you can force a hard stop by running SELECT pg_terminate_backend(PID);

     PID   │ RELNAME │ TRANSACTION ID │ GRANTED │                  QUERY                  │   AGE
  ─────────┼─────────┼────────────────┼─────────┼─────────────────────────────────────────┼───────────
    328112 │ null    │              0 │ t       │ SELECT * FROM logs;                     │ 00:04:20

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db locks

$ supabase inspect db total-index-size

This command displays the total size of all indexes on the database. It is calculated by taking the number of pages (reported in relpages) and multiplying it by the page size (8192 bytes).

    SIZE
  ─────────
    12 MB

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db total-index-size

$ supabase inspect db index-sizes

This command displays the size of each each index in the database. It is calculated by taking the number of pages (reported in relpages) and multiplying it by the page size (8192 bytes).

              NAME              │    SIZE
  ──────────────────────────────┼─────────────
    user_events_index           │ 2082 MB
    job_run_details_pkey        │ 3856 kB
    schema_migrations_pkey      │ 16 kB
    refresh_tokens_token_unique │ 8192 bytes
    users_instance_id_idx       │ 0 bytes
    buckets_pkey                │ 0 bytes

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db index-sizes

$ supabase inspect db index-usage

This command provides information on the efficiency of indexes, represented as what percentage of total scans were index scans. A low percentage can indicate under indexing, or wrong data being indexed.

       TABLE NAME     │ PERCENTAGE OF TIMES INDEX USED │ ROWS IN TABLE
  ────────────────────┼────────────────────────────────┼────────────────
    user_events       │                             99 │       4225318 
    user_feed         │                             99 │       3581573
    unindexed_table   │                              0 │        322911
    job               │                            100 │         33242
    schema_migrations │                             97 │             0
    migrations        │ Insufficient data              │             0

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db index-usage

$ supabase inspect db unused-indexes

This command displays indexes that have < 50 scans recorded against them, and are greater than 5 pages in size, ordered by size relative to the number of index scans. This command is generally useful for discovering indexes that are unused. Indexes can impact write performance, as well as read performance should they occupy space in memory, its a good idea to remove indexes that are not needed or being used.

        TABLE        │                   INDEX                    │ INDEX SIZE │ INDEX SCANS
─────────────────────┼────────────────────────────────────────────┼────────────┼──────────────
 public.users        │ user_id_created_at_idx                     │ 97 MB      │           0

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db unused-indexes

$ supabase inspect db total-table-sizes

This command displays the total size of each table in the database. It is the sum of the values that pg_table_size() and pg_indexes_size() gives for each table. System tables inside pg_catalog and information_schema are not included.

                NAME               │    SIZE
───────────────────────────────────┼─────────────
  job_run_details                  │ 395 MB
  slack_msgs                       │ 648 kB
  emails                           │ 640 kB

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db total-table-sizes

$ supabase inspect db table-sizes

This command displays the size of each table in the database. It is calculated by using the system administration function pg_table_size(), which includes the size of the main data fork, free space map, visibility map and TOAST data. It does not include the size of the table's indexes.

                  NAME               │    SIZE
  ───────────────────────────────────┼─────────────
    job_run_details                  │ 385 MB
    emails                           │ 584 kB
    job                              │ 40 kB
    sessions                         │ 0 bytes
    prod_resource_notifications_meta │ 0 bytes

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db table-sizes

$ supabase inspect db table-index-sizes

This command displays the total size of indexes for each table. It is calculated by using the system administration function pg_indexes_size().

                 TABLE               │ INDEX SIZE
  ───────────────────────────────────┼─────────────
    job_run_details                  │ 10104 kB
    users                            │ 128 kB
    job                              │ 32 kB
    instances                        │ 8192 bytes
    http_request_queue               │ 0 bytes

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db table-index-sizes

$ supabase inspect db cache-hit

This command provides information on the efficiency of the buffer cache and how often your queries have to go hit the disk rather than reading from memory. Information on both index reads (index hit rate) as well as table reads (table hit rate) are shown. In general, databases with low cache hit rates perform worse as it is slower to go to disk than retrieve data from memory. If your table hit rate is low, this can indicate that you do not have enough RAM and you may benefit from upgrading to a larger compute addon with more memory. If your index hit rate is low, this may indicate that there is scope to add more appropriate indexes.

The hit rates are calculated as a ratio of number of table or index blocks fetched from the postgres buffer cache against the sum of cached blocks and uncached blocks read from disk.

On smaller compute plans (free, small, medium), a ratio of below 99% can indicate a problem. On larger plans the hit rates may be lower but performance will remain constant as the data may use the OS cache rather than Postgres buffer cache.

         NAME      │  RATIO
  ─────────────────┼───────────
    index hit rate │ 0.996621
    table hit rate │ 0.999341

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db cache-hit

$ supabase inspect db table-record-counts

This command displays an estimated count of rows per table, descending by estimated count. The estimated count is derived from n_live_tup, which is updated by vacuum operations. Due to the way n_live_tup is populated, sparse vs. dense pages can result in estimations that are significantly out from the real count of rows.

       NAME    │ ESTIMATED COUNT
  ─────────────┼──────────────────
    logs       │          322943
    emails     │            1103
    job        │               1
    migrations │               0

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db table-record-counts

$ supabase inspect db seq-scans

This command displays the number of sequential scans recorded against all tables, descending by count of sequential scans. Tables that have very high numbers of sequential scans may be underindexed, and it may be worth investigating queries that read from these tables.

                  NAME               │ COUNT
  ───────────────────────────────────┼─────────
    emails                           │ 182435
    users                            │  25063
    job_run_details                  │     60
    schema_migrations                │      0
    migrations                       │      0

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db seq-scans

$ supabase inspect db replication-slots

This command shows information about logical replication slots that are setup on the database. It shows if the slot is active, the state of the WAL sender process ('startup', 'catchup', 'streaming', 'backup', 'stopping') the replication client address and the replication lag in GB.

This command is useful to check that the amount of replication lag is as low as possible, replication lag can occur due to network latency issues, slow disk I/O, long running transactions or lack of ability for the subscriber to consume WAL fast enough.

                       NAME                    │ ACTIVE │ STATE   │ REPLICATION CLIENT ADDRESS │ REPLICATION LAG GB
  ─────────────────────────────────────────────┼────────┼─────────┼────────────────────────────┼─────────────────────
    supabase_realtime_replication_slot         │ t      │ N/A     │ N/A                        │                  0
    datastream                                 │ t      │ catchup │ 24.201.24.106              │                 45

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db replication-slots

$ supabase inspect db role-connections

This command shows the number of active connections for each database roles to see which specific role might be consuming more connections than expected.

This is a Supabase specific command. You can see this breakdown on the dashboard as well: https://app.supabase.com/project/_/database/roles

The maximum number of active connections depends on your instance size. You can manually overwrite the allowed number of connection but it is not advised.



            ROLE NAME         │ ACTIVE CONNCTION
  ────────────────────────────┼───────────────────
    authenticator             │                5
    postgres                  │                5
    supabase_admin            │                1
    pgbouncer                 │                1
    anon                      │                0
    authenticated             │                0
    service_role              │                0
    dashboard_user            │                0
    supabase_auth_admin       │                0
    supabase_storage_admin    │                0
    supabase_functions_admin  │                0
    pgsodium_keyholder        │                0
    pg_read_all_data          │                0
    pg_write_all_data         │                0
    pg_monitor                │                0

Active connections 12/90

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db role-connections

$ supabase inspect db bloat

This command displays an estimation of table "bloat" - Due to Postgres' MVCC when data is updated or deleted new rows are created and old rows are made invisible and marked as "dead tuples". Usually the autovaccum process will asynchronously clean the dead tuples. Sometimes the autovaccum is unable to work fast enough to reduce or prevent tables from becoming bloated. High bloat can slow down queries, cause excessive IOPS and waste space in your database.

Tables with a high bloat ratio should be investigated to see if there are vacuuming is not quick enough or there are other issues.

    TYPE  │ SCHEMA NAME │        OBJECT NAME         │ BLOAT │ WASTE
  ────────┼─────────────┼────────────────────────────┼───────┼─────────────
    table │ public      │ very_bloated_table         │  41.0 │ 700 MB
    table │ public      │ my_table                   │   4.0 │ 76 MB
    table │ public      │ happy_table                │   1.0 │ 1472 kB
    index │ public      │ happy_table::my_nice_index │   0.7 │ 880 kB

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db bloat

$ supabase inspect db vacuum-stats

This shows you stats about the vacuum activities for each table. Due to Postgres' MVCC when data is updated or deleted new rows are created and old rows are made invisible and marked as "dead tuples". Usually the autovaccum process will aysnchronously clean the dead tuples.

The command lists when the last vacuum and last auto vacuum took place, the row count on the table as well as the count of dead rows and whether autovacuum is expected to run or not. If the number of dead rows is much higher than the row count, or if an autovacuum is expected but has not been performed for some time, this can indicate that autovacuum is not able to keep up and that your vacuum settings need to be tweaked or that you require more compute or disk IOPS to allow autovaccum to complete.

        SCHEMA        │              TABLE               │ LAST VACUUM │ LAST AUTO VACUUM │      ROW COUNT       │ DEAD ROW COUNT │ EXPECT AUTOVACUUM?
──────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────────┼─────────────┼──────────────────┼──────────────────────┼────────────────┼─────────────────────
 auth                 │ users                            │             │ 2023-06-26 12:34 │               18,030 │              0 │ no
 public               │ profiles                         │             │ 2023-06-26 23:45 │               13,420 │             28 │ no
 public               │ logs                             │             │ 2023-06-26 01:23 │            1,313,033 │      3,318,228 │ yes
 storage              │ objects                          │             │                  │             No stats │              0 │ no
 storage              │ buckets                          │             │                  │             No stats │              0 │ no
 supabase_migrations  │ schema_migrations                │             │                  │             No stats │              0 │ no

Flags

  • --db-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the database specified by the connection string (must be percent-encoded).

  • --linked
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the linked project.

  • --local
    Optional
    no type

    Inspect the local database.

supabase inspect db vacuum-stats

$ supabase projects create

Create a project on Supabase

Flags

  • --db-password <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Database password of the project.

  • --org-id <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Organization ID to create the project in.

  • --region <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Select a region close to you for the best performance.

supabase projects create [project name] [flags]

$ supabase projects list

List all Supabase projects the logged-in user can access.

supabase projects list

$ supabase projects api-keys

List all API keys for a Supabase project

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase projects api-keys [flags]

$ supabase projects delete

Delete a Supabase project

supabase projects delete <ref>

$ supabase branches create

Create a preview branch for the linked project.

Flags

  • --region <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Select a region to deploy the branch database.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase branches create [name] [flags]

$ supabase branches list

List all preview branches of the linked project.

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase branches list

$ supabase branches get

Retrieve details of the specified preview branch.

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase branches get <branch-id>

$ supabase branches update

Update a preview branch by its ID.

Flags

  • --git-branch <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Change the associated git branch.

  • --name <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Rename the preview branch.

  • --reset-on-push
    Optional
    no type

    Reset the preview branch on git push.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase branches update <branch-id> [flags]

$ supabase branches delete

Delete a preview branch by its ID.

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase branches delete <branch-id>

$ supabase branches disable

Disable preview branching for the linked project.

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase branches disable

$ supabase orgs create

Create an organization for the logged-in user.

supabase orgs create

$ supabase orgs list

List all organizations the logged-in user belongs.

supabase orgs list

$ supabase functions new

Create a new Function locally

supabase functions new <Function name>

$ supabase functions list

List all Functions in the linked Supabase project.

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase functions list [flags]

$ supabase functions download

Download the source code for a Function from the linked Supabase project.

Flags

  • --legacy-bundle
    Optional
    no type

    Use legacy bundling mechanism.

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase functions download <Function name> [flags]

$ supabase functions serve

Serve all Functions locally

Flags

  • --env-file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Path to an env file to be populated to the Function environment.

  • --import-map <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Path to import map file.

  • --no-verify-jwt
    Optional
    no type

    Disable JWT verification for the Function.

supabase functions serve [flags]

$ supabase functions deploy

Deploy a Function to the linked Supabase project.

Flags

  • --import-map <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Path to import map file.

  • --no-verify-jwt
    Optional
    no type

    Disable JWT verification for the Function.

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase functions deploy [Function name] [flags]

$ supabase functions delete

Delete a Function from the linked Supabase project. This does NOT remove the Function locally.

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase functions delete <Function name> [flags]

$ supabase secrets set

Set a secret(s) to the linked Supabase project.

Flags

  • --env-file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Read secrets from a .env file.

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase secrets set [flags] <NAME=VALUE> ...

$ supabase secrets list

List all secrets in the linked project.

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase secrets list

$ supabase secrets unset

Unset a secret(s) from the linked Supabase project.

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase secrets unset <NAME> ...

$ supabase storage ls

List objects by path prefix

Flags

  • -r, --recursive
    Optional
    no type

    Recursively list a directory.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase storage ls [path] [flags]

$ supabase storage cp

Copy objects from src to dst path

Flags

  • --cache-control <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Custom Cache-Control header for HTTP upload.

  • --content-type <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Custom Content-Type header for HTTP upload.

  • -j, --jobs <uint>
    Optional
    no type

    Maximum number of parallel jobs.

  • -r, --recursive
    Optional
    no type

    Recursively copy a directory.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase storage cp <src> <dst> [flags]

$ supabase storage mv

Move objects from src to dst path

Flags

  • -r, --recursive
    Optional
    no type

    Recursively move a directory.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase storage mv <src> <dst> [flags]

$ supabase storage cp

Copy objects from src to dst path

Flags

  • --cache-control <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Custom Cache-Control header for HTTP upload.

  • --content-type <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Custom Content-Type header for HTTP upload.

  • -j, --jobs <uint>
    Optional
    no type

    Maximum number of parallel jobs.

  • -r, --recursive
    Optional
    no type

    Recursively copy a directory.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

supabase storage cp <src> <dst> [flags]

$ supabase encryption get-root-key

Get the root encryption key of a Supabase project

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase encryption get-root-key

$ supabase encryption update-root-key

Update root encryption key of a Supabase project

Flags

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase encryption update-root-key

$ supabase sso add

Add and configure a new connection to a SSO identity provider to your Supabase project.

Flags

  • --attribute-mapping-file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    File containing a JSON mapping between SAML attributes to custom JWT claims.

  • --domains <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Comma separated list of email domains to associate with the added identity provider.

  • --metadata-file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    File containing a SAML 2.0 Metadata XML document describing the identity provider.

  • --metadata-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    URL pointing to a SAML 2.0 Metadata XML document describing the identity provider.

  • --skip-url-validation
    Optional
    no type

    Whether local validation of the SAML 2.0 Metadata URL should not be performed.

  • -t, --type <[ saml ]>
    REQUIRED
    no type

    Type of identity provider (according to supported protocol).

  • -o, --output <[ pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase sso add \
  --project-ref abcdefgijklmnopqrst \
  --type saml \
  --metadata-url 'https://...' \
  --domains company.com

$ supabase sso list

List all connections to a SSO identity provider to your Supabase project.

Flags

  • -o, --output <[ pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase sso list

$ supabase sso show

Provides the information about an established connection to an identity provider. You can use --metadata to obtain the raw SAML 2.0 Metadata XML document stored in your project's configuration.

Flags

  • --metadata
    Optional
    no type

    Show SAML 2.0 XML Metadata only

  • -o, --output <[ pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase sso show 6df4d73f-bf21-405f-a084-b11adf19fea5 \
  --project-ref abcdefghijklmnopqrst

$ supabase sso info

Returns all of the important SSO information necessary for your project to be registered with a SAML 2.0 compatible identity provider.

Flags

  • -o, --output <[ pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase sso info --project-ref abcdefghijklmnopqrst

$ supabase sso update

Update the configuration settings of a already added SSO identity provider.

Flags

  • --add-domains <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Add this comma separated list of email domains to the identity provider.

  • --attribute-mapping-file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    File containing a JSON mapping between SAML attributes to custom JWT claims.

  • --domains <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Replace domains with this comma separated list of email domains.

  • --metadata-file <string>
    Optional
    no type

    File containing a SAML 2.0 Metadata XML document describing the identity provider.

  • --metadata-url <string>
    Optional
    no type

    URL pointing to a SAML 2.0 Metadata XML document describing the identity provider.

  • --remove-domains <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Remove this comma separated list of email domains from the identity provider.

  • --skip-url-validation
    Optional
    no type

    Whether local validation of the SAML 2.0 Metadata URL should not be performed.

  • -o, --output <[ pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase sso update 6df4d73f-bf21-405f-a084-b11adf19fea5 \
  --project-ref abcdefghijklmnopqrst \
  --domains new-company.com,new-company.net

$ supabase sso remove

Remove a connection to an already added SSO identity provider. Removing the provider will prevent existing users from logging in. Please treat this command with care.

Flags

  • -o, --output <[ pretty | json | toml | yaml ]>
    Optional
    no type

    Output format

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase sso remove 6df4d73f-bf21-405f-a084-b11adf19fea5 \
  --project-ref abcdefghijklmnopqrst

$ supabase domains activate

Activates the custom hostname configuration for a project.

This reconfigures your Supabase project to respond to requests on your custom hostname. After the custom hostname is activated, your project's auth services will no longer function on the Supabase-provisioned subdomain.

Flags

  • --include-raw-output
    Optional
    no type

    Include raw output (useful for debugging).

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase domains activate

$ supabase domains create

Create a custom hostname for your Supabase project.

Expects your custom hostname to have a CNAME record to your Supabase project's subdomain.

Flags

  • --custom-hostname <string>
    Optional
    no type

    The custom hostname to use for your Supabase project.

  • --include-raw-output
    Optional
    no type

    Include raw output (useful for debugging).

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase domains create [flags]

$ supabase domains get

Retrieve the custom hostname config for your project, as stored in the Supabase platform.

Flags

  • --include-raw-output
    Optional
    no type

    Include raw output (useful for debugging).

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase domains get

$ supabase domains reverify

Re-verify the custom hostname config for your project

Flags

  • --include-raw-output
    Optional
    no type

    Include raw output (useful for debugging).

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase domains reverify

$ supabase domains delete

Deletes the custom hostname config for your project

Flags

  • --include-raw-output
    Optional
    no type

    Include raw output (useful for debugging).

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase domains delete

$ supabase vanity-subdomains activate

Activate a vanity subdomain for your Supabase project.

This reconfigures your Supabase project to respond to requests on your vanity subdomain. After the vanity subdomain is activated, your project's auth services will no longer function on the {project-ref}.{supabase-domain} hostname.

Flags

  • --desired-subdomain <string>
    Optional
    no type

    The desired vanity subdomain to use for your Supabase project.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase vanity-subdomains activate [flags]

$ supabase vanity-subdomains get

Get the current vanity subdomain

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase vanity-subdomains get

$ supabase vanity-subdomains check-availability

Checks if a desired subdomain is available for use

Flags

  • --desired-subdomain <string>
    Optional
    no type

    The desired vanity subdomain to use for your Supabase project.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase vanity-subdomains check-availability [flags]

$ supabase vanity-subdomains delete

Deletes the vanity subdomain for a project, and reverts to using the project ref for routing.

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase vanity-subdomains delete

$ supabase network-bans

Network bans are IPs that get temporarily blocked if their traffic pattern looks abusive (e.g. multiple failed auth attempts).

The subcommands help you view the current bans, and unblock IPs if desired.

$ supabase network-bans get

Get the current network bans

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase network-bans get

$ supabase network-bans remove

Remove a network ban

Flags

  • --db-unban-ip <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    IP to allow DB connections from.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase network-bans remove [flags]

$ supabase network-restrictions get

Get the current network restrictions

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase network-restrictions get

$ supabase network-restrictions update

Update network restrictions

Flags

  • --bypass-cidr-checks
    Optional
    no type

    Bypass some of the CIDR validation checks.

  • --db-allow-cidr <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    CIDR to allow DB connections from.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase network-restrictions update [flags]

$ supabase ssl-enforcement get

Get the current SSL enforcement configuration

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase ssl-enforcement get

$ supabase ssl-enforcement update

Update SSL enforcement configuration

Flags

  • --disable-db-ssl-enforcement
    Optional
    no type

    Whether the DB should disable SSL enforcement for all external connections.

  • --enable-db-ssl-enforcement
    Optional
    no type

    Whether the DB should enable SSL enforcement for all external connections.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase ssl-enforcement update [flags]

$ supabase postgres-config get

Get the current Postgres database config overrides

Flags

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase postgres-config get

$ supabase postgres-config update

Overriding the default Postgres config could result in unstable database behavior. Custom configuration also overrides the optimizations generated based on the compute add-ons in use.

Flags

  • --config <strings>
    Optional
    no type

    Config overrides specified as a 'key=value' pair

  • --replace-existing-overrides
    Optional
    no type

    If true, replaces all existing overrides with the ones provided. If false (default), merges existing overrides with the ones provided.

  • --experimental
    REQUIRED
    no type

    enable experimental features

  • --project-ref <string>
    Optional
    no type

    Project ref of the Supabase project.

supabase postgres-config update [flags]

$ supabase snippets list

List all SQL snippets of the linked project.

supabase snippets list

$ supabase snippets download

Download contents of the specified SQL snippet.

supabase snippets download <snippet-id>

$ supabase services

Show versions of all Supabase services

supabase services

$ supabase completion zsh

Generate the autocompletion script for the zsh shell.

If shell completion is not already enabled in your environment you will need to enable it. You can execute the following once:

echo "autoload -U compinit; compinit" >> ~/.zshrc

To load completions in your current shell session:

source <(supabase completion zsh)

To load completions for every new session, execute once:

Linux:

supabase completion zsh > "${fpath[1]}/_supabase"

macOS:

supabase completion zsh > $(brew --prefix)/share/zsh/site-functions/_supabase

You will need to start a new shell for this setup to take effect.

Flags

  • --no-descriptions
    Optional
    no type

    disable completion descriptions

supabase completion zsh [flags]

$ supabase completion powershell

Generate the autocompletion script for powershell.

To load completions in your current shell session:

supabase completion powershell | Out-String | Invoke-Expression

To load completions for every new session, add the output of the above command to your powershell profile.

Flags

  • --no-descriptions
    Optional
    no type

    disable completion descriptions

supabase completion powershell [flags]

$ supabase completion fish

Generate the autocompletion script for the fish shell.

To load completions in your current shell session:

supabase completion fish | source

To load completions for every new session, execute once:

supabase completion fish > ~/.config/fish/completions/supabase.fish

You will need to start a new shell for this setup to take effect.

Flags

  • --no-descriptions
    Optional
    no type

    disable completion descriptions

supabase completion fish [flags]

$ supabase completion bash

Generate the autocompletion script for the bash shell.

This script depends on the 'bash-completion' package. If it is not installed already, you can install it via your OS's package manager.

To load completions in your current shell session:

source <(supabase completion bash)

To load completions for every new session, execute once:

Linux:

supabase completion bash > /etc/bash_completion.d/supabase

macOS:

supabase completion bash > $(brew --prefix)/etc/bash_completion.d/supabase

You will need to start a new shell for this setup to take effect.

Flags

  • --no-descriptions
    Optional
    no type

    disable completion descriptions

supabase completion bash